2001 Homes Tour

 

Replica 1880 Townhouse

1880townhouse

Built by J. Queen, this two-story design is based on San Francisco row houses of the 1880's. The interior is light-filled and has high-ceilinged rooms. Creative design features make this a very special house. The current owners have an interesting and eclectic art collection, as well as many unique furnishings. The second story affords a magnificent view of the water.

Revival Craftsman

revivalcraftsman

This beautiful family home displays creative details throughout. Commanding a panoramic view, the house is filled with light and has a comfortable and interesting floor plan. The covered, wrap-around porch makes activities possible even on rainy days. The garden is unique and adds another dimension to the house.

Albert Bash House, 1890

albertbash

Current owners have been working 4 years to restore this Queen Anne-style house to its original elegance. Years of neglect necessitated weather-proofing as a first step, then reinforcement of the foundation and walls. The second story 1937-remodel was removed and construction of a new roofline was done, giving the home an appearance similar to the original building. A new basement entry was built, as well as the front porch. Several procedures are planned for the future, as this is a lengthy restoration process. The home provides a wonderful view from its hillside location.

A. Horace Tucker House, 1867

horacetucker

One of the oldest homes in Port Townsend, the exterior still retains remnants of its Greek Revival style. The house has had only four owners in its long history. Many original features have been preserved, including doors, the beautiful mahogany staircase, and original fir floors which have been restored and refinished. The Tucker house now encompasses over 2200 sq. ft. of modern living space combined with tasteful touches from the past.

Elias Devoe House, c. 1888eliasdevoe
This Queen Anne residence was built for Elias Devoe who was a partner in a firm that did masonry work in the town. Making use of this company's products, Devoe had his woodframe home veneered in brick, then stucco was applied over the soft brick and tooled to have a brick look. The current owners have started an extensive restoration necessitated after a decade of neglect of the house. In the two years since their purchase, they have re-roofed, upgraded, and established an old-fashioned flower garden and vegetable garden. In the interior, they strive to maintain the original features of this historic house.

Ann Starrett Mansion, 1889annstarret
A blend of architectural styles, this ten-room mansion has been called "carpenter gothic". The Four Seasons fresco adorns the ceiling of the octagonal tower, reached by a spiral staircase. Extensive renovation has brought new life to this famous Port Townsend landmark as a Victorian Bed & Breakfast.

Wyndham J. Lewis House, 1908wyndhamjlewis
Only the second time on the tour, this Craftsman-style shingle home demonstrates the features which appeared at the beginning of the 20th Century when the Victorian style moved away from gingerbread ornamentation toward more basic shapes. The home has the medium pitched roof with low shed dormers and wide eves with exposed rafter tails. The wide porch is framed by six large columns. The home decor reflects the owner's careful attention to detail in blending historic quality with traditional furnishings. Architectural details which grew out of the Arts & Crafts Movement emphasized handcrafted features. You will see wooden built-ins, tile fireplaces, and stonework.

Frank Hastings House, 1890frankhastings
This Queen Anne style house has served as a residence, boarding house, and bed & breakfast inn. It is one of the most photographed locations in Port Townsend, and displays many many unique features: interesting chandeliers and fireplaces, rounded porch and veranda, octagonal cupola and curved windows. The interior displays an assortment of unique furnishings.

Bishop Block, 1891
Bishop Victorian Guest Suites
bishopvictorian
This commercial structure has been home to a cigar store, tavern, garage and furniture store. Remodeling in the early 1980's provided business offices on the lower floors while the second and third stories provide spacious apartments enjoyed by guests. Handsome vintage models of Victorian-style furniture can be found throughout. A wonderful Victorian garden with gazebo has recently been completed behind the building.

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2002 Homes Tour

 

SAUNDERS HOUSE - 1891
jcsaundersThis large and impressive home has a colorful history and many unique features. It retains its Victorian charm despite having several owners over the years with differing ideas of renovation and decorating. Commanding a hillside lot overlooking the waterfront, the home has a wrap-around porch.A third story was used at various times for dancing, showing movies, and a girls' dormitory. An unusual feature of the home is the dining room fireplace, which has a window in the middle of the chimney.

N.W. 0'REAR HOUSE - 1891orear
Never before on the tour is this house in the process of being renovated. Although built during the Victorian period, the house surprises with interior features of mostly Craftsman detailing.Originally built as a carriage house for the F. W. Hastings home to the east, it was purchased by Newton O'Rear, a customs service officer.By1906, he had the house turned 180 degrees and converted into a 7-room residence.The Mansard roof was part of the original windmill attached to the carriage house.

CAPTAIN HENRY E. MORGAN HOUSE - 1866henryemorgan
First time on the tour is this home built in early Victorian style.A lovely bay window extends from the living room.The historic home has been tastefully furnished with attractive antiques.

Captain Morgan originally came west to join the gold rush in 1849 and eventually settled in Port Townsend. He was involved in several development schemes. Morgan Hill, the waterfront hill behind the uptown business district, was named by and for him. He personally planted many maple trees in the area.

LINCOLN H. PONTIUS HOUSE - 1889

pontius

Lincoln Pontius was a member of a prominent Washington pioneer family. He became a well-known property owner and real estate dealer in Port Townsend. The old stable and well house still stand on the Pontius property. Outstanding features of this house include oak and cherry framed fireplaces with beautiful tiles. Lovely, original stained glass panels are in the living room. An outstanding antique collection lends authenticity to this house.

VAN BUREN HOUSE - 1890vanburen
This one-and-a-half story cottage has been extensively and lovingly renovated by the present owners and currently contains many of their highly valued antiques. The exterior is enhanced by a soft shade of sea foam green on wooden lap siding, trimmed in white. There is evidence that the front door was originally at the foot of the stairs, but was moved when the inside stairway was brought forward. At that time there was only a side porch, which has now been extended to wrap around the front.

RAY O. SCOTT HOUSE - 1891rayoscott
This simple "tract house" has had only three owners. It was built and occupied by Cynthia J. Adams until its purchase in 1912 by the Scott family. Ray Scott was founder and publisher of the Port Townsend Leader. Among the house's interesting features are the outdoor fireplace and fountain made from river stone. The sidewalk and patio bear hand-and-foot-prints of the town's influential people in the early 1940's.

In 1977 the house was sold to the present owners, who have made major renovations to return this house to its original Victorian style.

 SAINT PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH - 1865stpauls
An example of Gothic Revival style, this church is the oldest church in the Episcopal Diocese of Olympia, and the oldest Episcopal Church in continuous use in Washington. Originally it was built on a picturesque site below the bluff and in 1883, at the request of the town council, the church was placed on logs and moved to its present location with horses and a windlass. Unlike popular conceptions of "Victorian architecture", the church is almost completely devoid of ornament and relies on vertical proportions for its effectiveness.

FENN HOUSE - 1887fennhouse
Fenn House was built as the rectory for Saint Paul's Episcopal Church and was built in a style compatible with the church. First occupied by Rev. Jesse Taylor,it continued to provide housing for the rectors and vicars of Saint Paul's until 1989. Fenn House has original woodwork throughout in the floors, window sashes, and moldings. In the 1990's the kitchen was removed. A Parish Hall and a church office were then added. Fenn House is currently used for the Rector's office, nursery, children's chapel, and meeting rooms.

CAPTAIN THOMAS & LIZZIE GRANT HOUSE - 1888thomaslizziegrant
Born in Nova Scotia, Captain Grant reached Puget Sound in 1874 and worked variously as captain, crewmember and pilot of stern-wheelers, steamers, tugs and oriental freighters. He and Lizzie Pritchard were married in Seattle in 1886 and built this house in Port Townsend, which is a fine example of Italianate Villa style.
The exterior symmetry of the beautiful two-story bay windows conceals a surprisingly asymmetrical interior plan. The original French wallpaper, elaborate ceiling medallion, and cast iron mantelpiece highlight the inviting parlor. The mantelpiece is painted to resemble Tennessee rose marble. The quarter-scale Victorian doghouse in the backyard is a special attraction.

PETTYGROVE HOUSE- circa 1888spettygrove
First time on the tour is this Victorian bungalow built by Sarah G. Pettygrove, widow of Al Pettygrove, founder of the newspaper Puget Sound Argus. Sarah bestowed her elegance and style on the little house, using decorative brackets on the exterior and elegant floral and geometric wallpaper on the interior. The current owners have restored the high ceilings in the living and dining rooms, and have done extensive work on the gardens, patio and deck. In restoring the ceilings, they found Sarah's original wallpaper.

TEA HOUSE at the Masonic Templemasonictemple
A special tea house is planned this year! Volunteers will be in period dress. Due to creative planning, theroom decor will reflect Victorian ambiance. Complimentary cookies and tea or coffee are provided for a relaxing interval during the tour.

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2003 Homes Tour

 

DR. GEORGE V. CALHOUN HOUSE, circa 1873

vcalhoun 2003

First time on the tour, this historic farm style home was the residence of Dr. George V. Calhoun. In 1866, Dr. Calhoun came to Port Angeles and took charge of the marine hospital. Two years later he moved to Port Townsend, where he established a Marine Hospital.

There have been no structural changes to the home. It has original wallpaper in some rooms and original sashes and wood floors. The home features two front parlors. One is a ladies' tea room, and the other is a men's sitting room. The kitchen is unique as it once was an immigrant duplex that was moved from an unknown location and placed against the house. The yard contains lovely old fruit trees.

 SCHOENLEBER HOUSE (Hastings Estate) - circa 1870's

schoenleber 2003

This property was originally homesteaded by F. W. Pettygrove. In 1866 a portion of the land was sold to L. B. Hastings, who sold it to Anthony Prongua in 1882.

The present owners renovated the house, keeping as close to the original as possible. The outside of this white frame building is trimmed in blue and redwood. A sturdy skeleton of rough-cut lumber is secured with square nails. False ceilings and up to six layers of wallpaper were removed and replaced with historically correct paint colors and patterned wallpaper borders. Original findings include a plaster ceiling medallion in the living room, along with original wainscoting and brick chimney in the dining room.

The Schoenlebers labored meticulously to restore this historic home to its original state.

tibbalsbldg 2003 PALACE HOTEL (view site)
occupies the two upper floors of HENRY L. TIBBALS BUILDING -1890

Built in the Richardson Romanesque style and constructed for a retired sea captain, one of Port Townsend's most colorful residents, this building has had a checkered history. Originally the first floor housed a billiard parlor and saloon known as the Townsend Tavern, with rooms to rent upstairs. From 1925 to 1933 the upper stories became a brothel and hotel, known as "The Palace of Sweets". Following an early morning raid by the sheriff, that enterprise was eventually closed. A long restoration process of the building was begun in 1976.

The Palace Hotel now occupies the second and third floors of the renovated Victorian building. The hotel features 17 guest rooms and suites, each uniquely decorated in a Victorian theme. A Quilter's retail shop and a Coffee shop are on the building's first level.

A colorful skylight provides interest to the landing on the second story, which serves as a comfortable lobby for guests.

hitthouse 2003 J. M. HITT HOUSE - circa 1890

Never before on the tour is this Victorian shingle house on Monroe Street. The house was built by J. M. Hitt who was the superintendent of the Port Townsend Schools from 1897 - 1904. Hitt is credited with bringing the four-year course accreditation to the school.

In the 1920s the house was owned by Phil Chase, who served as Jefferson Country Sheriff during the prohibition days. It housed soldiers during both world wars and was still divided into apartments when Pete and Betty Pedersen, of Pedersen Oil, returned the house to a single family house, raised their family and lived in the home for many years.

The current owners are still in the midst of a substantial renovation, which so far has included building three new Rumford fireplaces and lifting the house to build a new foundation and living/office area on the ground floor.

stockandhouse 2003 JAMES W. STOCKAND HOUSE - 1887

This stately Victorian home was built in 1887 by merchant James W. Stockand. It is the only seven-gabled home in Port Townsend. The current owners moved in a year ago and have begun remodeling projects to enhance the splendor of this beautiful Victorian.

The downstairs entertaining rooms were built in a grand style with unusual cornice molding and elaborate plaster ceiling medallions. Hand-screened Victorian wallpaper found in the parlour and dining room complements the antique furniture in the rooms. A large handmade stained glass window depicting a colorful peacock shines light in the downstairs bathroom. Throughout most of the house, picture and chair railing has been restored and the original wood floors have been refinished. Additional projects include tile work, wallpaper, woodwork and hardware restoration.

roberthillhouse 2003 ROBERT C. HILL HOUSE - circa 1872

Robert C. Hill moved to Port Townsend in 1882. With Col. Henry Landes, he established the First National Bank.

Distinctive features of this charming Victorian house include unusual fireplaces, stippled woodwork, ornate moldings, hand-cast hinges, built-in-hutches, and a cozy sitting porch. The delightful gardens feature Victorian plantings, holly trees, and rose bushes. The 100-year old upside down Camperdown Elm is on the historical tree register.

sachshouse 2003 MORRIS AND MATTIE SACHS HOUSE - 1890

Commanding majestic water views, this house has been renovated by the current owners in recent years. The home was built for Mattie Landes and Morris Sachs as a wedding gift from the bride's father, Colonel Henry Landes. Col. Landes was one of the city's most influential businessmen.

Morris Sachs arrived in Port Townsend in 1883. He held offices of City attorney, City Treasurer, and Judge of the Superior Court embracing Jefferson, Clallam, Island, San Juan and Kitsap Counties. In 1889, Sachs married Mattie. The marriage was brief; she died two years later, leaving a daughter.

mcintyrehouse 2003 CAPTAIN JAMES McINTYRE HOUSE - circa 1871

James McIntyre built this house for his wife, Sophie Pettygrove, daughter of one of Port Townsend's founders. James, a native of Scotland, went to sea at an early age and was a pioneer of the days of deep-water sailing on the Pacific. The Captain went down with his ship, the steamer Bristol, after it struck a rock on the Alaskan coast in 1902.

The simple rectangular home was enlarged in the 1880s to include such stylish additions as bay windows and an ornate porch. Outstanding features of this house include marble fireplaces and an impressive wood mantelpiece with a mirror with original Victorian tiles.

presbchurch 2003 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (view site)

With cornerstone laid in 1875, dedicated in 1877, this was the first stone church north of the Columbia River. As population growth necessitated a larger church, the stones were used in the foundation for the new frame building, built in 1889. The pipe organ, one of the very few remaining instruments built by Whalley & Genung, is the oldest organ in the state of Washington still in its original home. A new fellowship hall was dedicated in March 1990.

 TEA HOUSE AT THE MASONIC TEMPLEmasonictemple 2003

Step back in time when you visit the charming Victorian Tea House at the Masonic Temple. The room decor will reflect Victorian ambiance. Visitors will be greeted by volunteers in period dress. At the Tea House, Visitors will find a comfortable place to rest and enjoy delectable refreshments, a thank you from the Hospital Auxiliary for attending the Homes Tour.

The Masonic Temple was built in 1932.

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2004 Homes Tour

 

Albert Bash House, c. 1890

albertbash

This impressive Queen Anne style house was completed in 1890 for Albert W. Bash and his wife Flora. In 1881, President Garfield appointed Bash as Customs Collector for the District of Puget Sound.

Current owners have been working to restore this home to a semblance of its original elegance. Years of neglect necessitated weather-proofing as a first step, then reinforcement of the foundation and walls. The second story 1930s remodel was removed and construction of a new roofline was done, giving the home an appearance similar to the original building. Building codes and financial considerations prevented an exact restoration. A new basement entry was built, as well as the front and back porches. Future work planned by the current owners will mostly involve the interior, as this lengthy restoration process will involve attention to period details of the aesthetic style. The home provides magnificent views from its hillside location.

masonictemple 2003 Tea House at the Masonic Temple

Step back in time when you visit the charming Tea House decorated as a Victorian parlor featuring a library theme. Visitors will be greeted by volunteers in period dress. At the Tea House, you will find a comfortable place to rest and enjoy delectable refreshments, a thank you from the Hospital Auxiliary for your participation. The Masonic Temple was built in 1932. Visitors are welcome to view the entire building.

watersthotel 2004 Waterstreet Hotel in the N. D. Hill Building, 1889

N. D. Hill arrived in Port Townsend in 1868. He became the first manufacturer of pharmaceutical medicines and drugs in the area. As a Territorial Representative, he was one of the leaders in the drive for Washington statehood.

The historic N. D. Hill building was designed by noted Seattle architect, Elmer H. Fisher. The Hill building was constructed for the family business with a drugstore downstairs, manufacturing operations on the second floor, and offices on the third floor.

Although principally Italianate in design, the N. D. Hill Building displays both Grecian and Romanesque influences.

The Waterstreet Hotel occupies the second and third floors of the building. The hotel combines old-world charm with scenic views of mountains and Puget Sound. Water Street Brewing & Ale is located on the first floor. A Native Art Gallery located in the hotel lobby offers various art forms of Northwest artisans.

In 1981, many scenes from the movie An Officer and a Gentleman were filmed in the then Town Tavern on the ground floor of the building. The back of the building and surrounding area were used extensively in the filming of the movie, Snow Falling on Cedars, as people boarded at the old ferry dock.

dhhillhouse D.H. Hill House,1862

First time open to the public, this stately house displays A. Horace Tucker's simplicity of design. This originally one and a half-story balloon frame house has been changed over the years including the addition of a two story enlargement of the back of the house. Currently, a remodel is in progress. This house is commonly referred to as the D.H. Hill House.

Land records indicate that in 1862, title to this site was held in the name of Robert M. Caines. In l852, Captain Joseph Caines with his wife and two children, Mary Jane and Robert Marshall, arrived in Port Townsend on the bark, Amelia. In 1885 Daniel H. Hill and Hannah "Kate" Morgan were married. The bride's father, Captain H.E. Morgan, presented this house to Daniel and Kate as a wedding gift. Daniel was a Port Townsend druggist and was active in community affairs. Kate added to the house stylish moldings and gingerbread trim. She ordered an elegant new staircase from Seattle which was too large. Kate had the walls rebuilt and adjusted to accommodate the new staircase.

In 1994, the current owners purchased the home and have been lovingly working on a construction project keeping in mind the historical origins of the house.

englerhouse Engler House, 1990

Allan and Barbara Engler built this lovely neo-Victorian house. Pink fish-scale shingles distinguish the entry to the one-story home. Nine-foot ceilings are found throughout the house except for the living room ceiling which is 10 feet high.

Intricate gingerbread decorations portraying a Victorian look were fashioned by Allan Engler in his basement workshop. He also made the decorative stained glass pieces. Mr. Engler's further talents are demonstrated in the beautiful gardens with its attractive stepping stones.

Furnishings in the home include treasures collected by the Englers in their travels throughout the world.

This immaculately kept home was chosen for this year's Homes Tour as it provides a fine example of 20th century interpretation of Victorian home-style.

jameshouse Francis Wilcox James House, 1889

This Victorian mansion commands a majestic view of Port Townsend Bay and the Cascade and Olympic Mountain ranges. It was built over a period of three years (1889 - 1891), by Francis W. James and his wife Mary.

The house was one of the few conceived, supervised, financed and finished with one goal in mind - Mr. James wanted the attention to be on quality, craftsmanship, and detail of design, using only the finest materials his money could buy. In the end, the James House cost $10,000 at a time when most of Port Townsend's other grand mansions were being built for $5,000 to $6,000.

Much of the finish materials used in construction were imported from other parts of the country. Native wild cherry from Virginia was brought around Cape Horn for the impressive three story grand staircase which greets visitors upon entry. The intricate parquet floors are made of oak, walnut, and cherry. Four of the nine original fireplaces remain and boast, Minton tile frames with elaborate carved mantels.

In 1973, after a nine year restoration, the James House was place on the National Register of Historic Places, and became the first Bed & Breakfast in the Northwest. Today, it is privately owned.

judsonhouse Mary Judson House c. 1887

First time on tour is this delightful one-level house. A beautiful and fragrant rose covered arched trellis enhances the entry to the home. The style of the house is similar to the Learned House on this year's tour.

Land records indicate that Mary Judson purchased the land in 1870 from E. S. Fowler. She was born in England and as a child came with her parents to New York. In 1865 they left New York on a sailing vessel traveling to San Francisco and up the coast to Port Townsend.

Mary met John Paul Judson in Port Townsend. They were married in 1866. The 1872 Business Directory for Port Townsend lists J. P. Judson as an attorney.

In 2000, William Miller and Karen Knowlton purchased the house. William and Karen commented that they acted as "stewards of the house" during a three-year restoration project. Original fir flooring, baseboards, and moldings can be found in some rooms of the house. The back porch was added after the house was originally built. The kitchen has been updated and is light and spacious.

In 2003, the current owners acquired the property. They added elegant front steps, and decorated the home with lovely antique furnishings and many of their Norwegian family treasures,

hastingshouse Lucinda Hastings House c. 1890

This gracious mansion was built for early pioneer, Lucinda Hastings, widow of Loren Brown Hastings. The unique home commands a magnificent view of Admiralty Inlet and Port Townsend Bay. Lucinda, her husband Loren B. Hastings, and their children arrived in Port Townsend in 1852. She was one of the first white women in the area.

The Morning Leader in January 1891 stated,

"Of the fine residences recently built, that of Mrs. Lucinda Hastings is the most costly yet built in this City, representing an investment of nearly $14,000. It is two stories, occupies a commanding view and is admirably arranged throughout ...

The entire building is heated with hot water, which is probably the first house in town to adapt this new feature."

The covered widow's walk, hand-carved oak staircase, five fireplaces with Minton tile framing and unusual stained glass windows are but a few of the special features of this home. Three windows of jewel glass at the first landing light the stairway. The center one represents "Morning and Night".

A great-great granddaughter of the original owner currently owns the home. She and her husband purchased the house in 1979. She has brought some of the Hastings family heirlooms back into the house.

learnedhouse Alphonso Fowler Learned House c. 1873

This enchanting home looks out on the historic 1890 Bell Tower and St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 1865. The house was built by shipbuilder William McCurdy for Dr. Samuel and Catherine McCurdy. It was a wedding gift to their youngest daughter Isabelle and her husband, Alphonso Fowler Learned. Learned was born in Boston and began a seafaring life at the age of 19, as a cabin boy. He made several voyages around the world and arrived in Port Townsend in 1859 as a mate on the bark Goldhunter. Learned joined his uncle, Captain Enoch S. Fowler in his successful mercantile business. He was the first delegate from Jefferson County to the territorial legislature.

Harry and Mary Jordan purchased the house in 1964 and were the first owners outside the Learned family. Mary Jordan received a Jefferson County Historical Society Preservation Award in 1989 for maintaining the integrity of the house.

The current owners have made the two bedroom, one bath house available as a cottage rental. The furnishings in the house are mostly of the Victorian period.

bowenhouse Walter Bowen House c. 1895

This modest Victorian house, near Chetzemoka Park, was built by Walter Bowen. He held the positions of Jefferson County Assessor, Treasurer and Judicial Officer. Bowen was a special deputy collector of customs under Collect James C. Saunders.

Simple in design, much of the front exterior of the house remains the same today as when it was built. The interior has been "modernized" over the years, with most of the changes made in the l950s. An original Victorian door remains in the guestroom. The current owners purchased the house in 2002 as a getaway cottage. They have made an extensive cosmetic transformation to its interiors and yard, retaining its longtime bright red exterior color. Housing the owners' country collections, it is a charming, casual first-time addition to the homes tour.

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2005 Homes Tour

 

Captain John Quincy Adams House 1887johnquincyadams house

The architecture of this home partakes of elements borrowed from three concurrent sub-styles of Victorian architecture: the Bracket Villa style, the Queen Ann and the Stick style.

The home was built by Albert C. Adams and named after his father who was a descendent of the renowned Adams family of Revolutionary times. John Quincy Adams, who was called by the locals the "Old Veteran", served his country by voluntarily entering the Union Army when he was 47 years of age, well beyond the "necessary age of service."

The 1890 directory listed the father and son as capitalists, the local voters' registration listed John as a grocer. At the time of his death in 1896 John operated a confectionery store at the upper end of Water Street.

The home was built for $5,000.00 and was built for speculation rather than the actual occupation by the owner. The Adams home was one of the larger homes built for speculation. Albert owned extensive properties and was a real estate speculator and builder. Eventually Adams was stricken by the economic depression and he lost the house when the First National Bank foreclosed on the mortgage.

The home was later owned by Charles Edward Coons, the first Lieutenant Governor of Washington State and three-time Mayor of Port Townsend. Charles was born in New York in 1842 and died in Port Townsend in 1920.

teahouse masonic Tea House at the Masonic Temple

The Victorian Tea House is your opportunity to pause during the tour for complimentary tea, coffee and cookies served by volunteers in period costume. Each year the Tea House has a new theme, always in keeping with Victoriana.

In addition to refreshments, there will be items for purchase such as cookbooks (including the popular cookie cookbook) signed homes tour posters (suitable for framing) and a sampling of items from our newly refurbished hospital gift shop. The Jefferson Healthcare Hospital Gift Shop is managed and staffed by members of the hospital auxiliary.

Rutz Building - Upstairs Apartment - 1889 

rutz buildingFirst time on the tour is this charming apartment displaying furnishings from the period of the 1800s. Dr. Gallus Rutz was a pharmacist who purchased the site in 1889. The two story wood framed building housed a pharmacy downstairs, and the Rutz family lived in the quarters upstairs.

By 1897, Dr. Rutz's son, Walter, had taken over the business and operated it in the same location until March of 1904. After purchasing Pfeiffer's Drug Store, he and his partner Billy Hill moved the store downtown. The store front remained empty for many years but Walter continued to live in the upstairs and to care for his mother until her death.

Helen Olberg Gunn purchased the site in 1965 and for many years operated the Jack and Jill Children's Clothing Store in the downstairs and Aunt Lillie's Gift Shop upstairs. In the 1990's, Ms. Gunn's daughter Helen took over the daily management until her mother's death in 1994 and then continued to operate the clothing store until 1995. The Wild Coho restaurant is now located downstairs, and the upstairs is an apartment. The Rutz Building is in original condition, with minor changes made internally over the years.

mv lotus M.V. Lotus 1909

This Edwardian Era houseboat plied the waters of Puget Sound, transporting the original owner's family and friends on vacations of elegant style and comfort. It was built for Maurice McMicken, an attorney who was the legal counsel to the Washington State legislature. He was also the publisher of the Seattle Post Intelligencer newspaper, a sportsman and civic leader. The Lotus was designed to cruise the inside passage of the Pacific Northwest by naval architects Lee & Brinton and built in the Sloan yard of Seattle. The boat is 92 feel long and weighs 102 tons.

The interior of the Lotus is beautifully appointed and the main cabin features beautiful woodwork. The personal writing desk holds original china and crystal with the Lotus insignia. The current owners are painstakingly refurbishing the beautiful floating house and establishing The M/V Lotus Foundation to preserve its heritage.

strong house N.C. Strong House 1898

N.C. Strong, the original owner of this house, was the manager of the Merchant Bank in Port Townsend. He was active in local politics and in 1895 was a member of the town's "committee of 50" an organization dedicated to rejuvenating Port Townsend after the railroad chose to terminate in Tacoma, rather than Port Townsend. The railroad terminus had been anticipated for years and would be for many years to come, but in the end would never materialize.

This handsome house was built by W.A. Kuehn for around two thousand dollars. The rear, upstairs portion of the house as well as the carriage house was added sometime between 1900 and 1911. Unlike some Port Townsend houses that were abandoned during the years of economic downturn; the Strong House has been occupied by various owners since its construction in 1898. Each of these owners has adapted this home to their needs and tastes, but the basic features and structure of this home remain intact. The stucco exterior was applied more than 85 years ago, but the home retains its original form. The Strong House has not been on a homes tour for many years.

foppiano house Foppiano House 1891

This property was originally purchased by A. A. Plummer Jr. for the sum of $500.00 for two lots. The County Records show that in 1890 G.F. Foppiano bought the land for $1000.00. A land speculator from Bend Oregon, Foppiano owned many houses in Port Townsend. He built this house at 833 Taylor in 1891 for $125.00.

With its cheerful yellow exterior, this house is a fine example of a small turn of the century rental home that has been restored through the years very attractively with personal touches by each of the owners. The back deck leads down to a lovely secret garden.

Ferdinand Schlager House C 1900 schlager house

William Schlager, a German immigrant, built this house in 1890 on Tyler Street (known then as Maple), and it was originally leased as a residence and millinery shop. William's son Ferdinand moved the house in 1907 to its present location by mounting it on logs and using horses to pull it down F Street. Once the house was in place, Ferdinand added two rooms on each floor at the front, reconfigured the stairway and added upper and lower porches. In 1909, The Port Townsend Leader called this home "one of the show places" in the city. It is one of only a few Colonial Revival-style houses in Port Townsend. The Schlager family for many years owned and operated Key City Greenhouses, and the greenhouses themselves were located on the lots behind the house. They pioneered the raising of holly for commercial purposes on the peninsula, and shipped thousands of pounds annually to all parts of the country.

Sterming's Block/The Belmont 1885 sterming block

George Sterming erected this building to house his waterfront saloon and restaurant. An experienced saloon keeper, his establishment was frequented by the various members of maritime trades who knew Sterming's saloon was the place to go for good food & drink.

The upper floor contained offices, some used by Whiteway & Schroeder, two of early Port Townsend's busiest architects.

Today the Belmont offers a fine restaurant on the main floor and 4 lovely hotel rooms on the upper lever, two with commanding water views and two overlooking picturesque Water Street.

chapelThe Chapel c. 1850's

Perched on a bluff overlooking Port Townsend and Admiralty Inlet, Chapel Bay is beginning the next chapter of its long history. This lovely old building was the original parish hall for St. Paul's Episcopal Church. Located behind St. Paul's since the 1890's, it has been said that this building was barged from Bellingham in the 1800's. When St. Paul's decided to build a new parish hall in the late 1990's, the old parish hall was rescued by the current owner, Penee D'Amico, and moved to its present location.

The building sits atop a daylight basement. The hall's interior has been refurbished with the original windows, and wainscoting. The open main floor has a small kitchen and bath. The Chapel is one of the oldest buildings in Port Townsend. From its first days as a church, to its new role as a Victorian wedding chapel and event center, this charming building links Port Townsend's past and the present.

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2006 Homes Tour

 

Grace House 1887

grace house

This beautiful home was built in 1887 by 26 year old James W. Stockand with the help of his brother-in-law Thomas Drummond, a Port Townsend contractor. The house and its carriage house were completed in 1890 at a cost of $3,400. Restoration of this house which included a new foundation and roof was completed in 1978. Further renovations in the late 1980's were recognized by the Jefferson County Historical Society and the owners received the Mary Johnson Award of Appreciation.

Over the past several years the current owners who moved into this house in 2001, have continued the careful restoration of the interior of this home. The house has a new roof, rebuilt chimneys, new wiring and plumbing and refinished wood floors as well as historically accurate hand-screened Victorian wallpapers by Bradbury & Bradbury.

Recently completed is a new downstairs bath with its antique dresser sink and a mosaic tile floor consisting of 6 colors and 4000 separate pieces of tile requiring more than 3000 separate cuts. The upstairs bathroom which was carved out of attic space in the early 1900's is now an elegant master bath with Jacuzzi tub, propane fireplace, original claw foot tub and angel tile wall mural. This house is a fine blend of Victorian charm and modern amenities.

frank hastings house

Frank W. Hastings House c. 1890

Senator Frank Hastings was the second son of Port Townsend founder Loren B. Hastings. Frank began building this big red mansion in 1889. His plan was to build a $10,000 mansion to impress his fiancé, but he went broke in the depression of 1891 and was forced to abandon its construction before completion. He managed to get the house weather tight ‐ roof, walls, and windows – and to get three rooms livable with the last of his money. He lived in the unfinished house until he lost it for back taxes in 1904 to Mr. Olsen, the county tax assessor.

Mr. Olsen finished the house and rented a room to August Duddenhausen, the German Consul, from 1908 until 1911. Duddenhausen was allowed to do his official business in the parlor. The Hastings House is now a lovely Bed &Breakfast called The Old Consulate Inn. It is a fine example of Queen Anne style architecture and has commanding view of Port Townsend Bay, Mount Rainier and the Historic Court House.

lincoln pontius

Lincoln H. Pontius House 1889

This beautiful Victorian was built by Lincoln Pontius in 1889. He came from a family of Washington pioneers and was a real estate dealer in the early years of Port Townsend. The house has been tastefully updated but still retains its original tile and oak/cherry trimmed fireplaces. The stained glass panels in the living room are thought to have originally been above the double doors that once greeted visitors to this lovely home. The current owners have found the perfect setting for their fine collection of antiques.

The third story of the Pontius House was unfinished when the current owners purchased this house and they have made excellent use of this space as it is now a large bedroom/playroom. The grounds of the Pontius House include the old well-house and stable.

Commanding Officer's House at Fort Worden 1904

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After the Puget Sound Naval Shipyards were established at Bremerton in 1895, the military saw the need for fortifications at Admiralty Inlet to protect the entrance to Puget Sound. Ft. Casey on Whidbey Island, Fort Flagler on Marrowstone Island and Fort Worden were built in the early 1900's to provide that protection. Fort Worden was decommissioned in 1951, purchased by the state of Washington in 1957 and became a state park in 1973.

The Commanding Officer's House at Fort Worden was completed in April of 1904. Located at the head of Officers Row overlooking Admiralty Inlet, this almost 6000 square foot house was home to more than 30 commanding officers and their families. The house is now a museum and is decorated with furnishings and artifacts from the late Victorian early Edwardian eras. The home welcomes you with the dining room set for an elegant dinner party and upstairs there are toys scattered on the floor in the children's room.

Charles Eisenbeis' Manresa Castle 1892

manresa

Charles Eisenbeis emigrated from his native Prussia and arrived in Port Townsend in 1858. He saw a bright future for the town and his many business interests eventually included a cracker factory, lumber mill, brickworks, brewery, bank, and a hotel. He was part of the group of influential businessmen known as the "Big Five Syndicate" and in 1878 when Port Townsend became an incorporated city; he was elected its first Mayor. He built his home on the hill looking down on the city and fashioned it the style of the grand castles of his native Prussia.

It was the largest private residence ever built in Port Townsend and on the West Coast at the time and had 30 rooms. After Charles died in 1902 the castle was left empty for almost 20 years. For a while it was a vacation home for Seattle nuns then was purchased by the Jesuits in 1927. They added a large wing the next year to house sleeping rooms and chapel and covered the bricks of the original house with stucco to match the new addition. The Jesuits named it Manresa after the town in Spain where Ignatius Loyola founded their order.

It still retains its wonderful Victorian elegance. The Castle also features "the finest dining room" on the Olympic Peninsula according to Northwest Best Places and a beautiful Edwardian Lounge that was the original parlor room of the house. Also, the entire building is furnished in the original period antiques.

rothschild house

Rothschild House 1868

David Charles Henry Rothschild was born in Bavaria in 1824. He immigrated to the United States in 1843, landed in New York, and then traveled to Kentucky where he worked in his brother's store until word of the California Gold Rush reached the East Coast. Over the next thirteen years he was involved in activities related to the Gold Rush and travels abroad to the South Seas and Orient. Arriving in Port Townsend in 1858 he soon opened a mercantile business called "The Kentucky Store" in 1859. He married, and with his wife Dorette lived above the downtown store until he had the Rothschild House built in 1868. The Rothschilds were the only people to live in this West coast "Greek Revival" architectural style house through 1954. After the death of Emilie Rothschild, Henry and Dorette's youngest daughter, the Rothschild family descendants gave the house to Washington State Parks in 1959 to serve as a museum. The house is sited to command a sweeping view of Port Townsend, Admiralty Inlet and the Cascade Range. The Rothschild House is on the National Register of Historic Places and is managed by the Jefferson County Historical Society.

point wilson lightkeeper

Lightkeeper's House at Point Wilson 1879

First time on the Homes Tour, the Lightkeeper's House predates many of the buildings in Fort Worden. Built in 1879 the original lighthouse sat atop the lightkeeper's living quarters. On the second floor can be seen the door that was the entrance to the original lighthouse. The first lightkeeper was a civil war veteran named David M. Littlefield. The houses at Point Wilson were occupied by the lightkeepers until the automation of the light took place in 1975. The most recent residents of the houses were the crewmen of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Osprey.

This house is actually a duplex to accommodate the lightkeeper and the assistant lightkeeper. Much of the interior has been remodeled although the stairway banisters appear to be original. The property at Point Wilson is now under the auspices of the Bureau of Land Management.

Point Wilson Lighthouse 1913

point wilson lighthouse

Established in 1879, Point Wilson first showed its fixed white beam on December 15th of that same year. The name of the light comes from Captain George Vancouver who first sighted the point in May of 1792. Previous to that, the Clallam and Chiacum Indians knew the point as Kamkum and Kam-kum-ho. The original light was located on top of the lightkeeper's house. It was moved to its present location when the structure was built in 1913. The first lightkeeper at Point Wilson was David M. Littlefield, a civil war veteran who lived in Port Townsend for several years. The lens was changed in 1887 when the 3 red panels were added.

Judge Ralston House 1890

judge ralston house

Originally a farm house with outbuildings, this grand Victorian was home to Judge John Ralston, his wife Lizzie and their two children Catherine and Graham. Apparently they purchased this country house shortly after it was built in order to raise goats on the property because of Catherine's milk allergy. John Ralston was originally from Nova Scotia, came to Port Townsend at the age of 20, was admitted to the bar in 1895, married Lizzie Waite in 1889, served as a prosecuting attorney and became a superior court judge for island, Clallam and Jefferson counties in 1912.

The original house contained two parlors, a dining room and a kitchen downstairs and four bedrooms upstairs. Around 1905 the Ralstons added a downstairs kitchen wing, sun porch, pantry and larder and two more bedrooms and a bath upstairs. Later changes included the relocation of the kitchen to the site of the former pantry and larder and the conversion of a small bedroom into a second bathroom. The most recent change is the major addition of a garage with a large apartment above it. Moldings and woodwork in the newest addition are in the same style as in the original house.

vintage hardware

TEA HOUSE at The Kelly Building

A new location for the 2006 Tea House is the second floor of the Kelly Building at 2000 Sims Way. This beautiful building is easily recognizable with its striking Victorian facade. Please come up to the second floor for complimentary tea and cookies provided by the hospital auxiliary and be sure to take time to tour the Kelly Art Deco Light Museum. The museum features a collection of over 400 chandeliers, wall sconces and table lights and is the only American Art Deco Slip-Shade Light Museum in the world today. Before you leave be sure to check out the beautiful hardware, light fixtures, antiques and accessories for sale in Vintage Hardware located on the main floor.

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2008 Homes Tour

 

George W. Downs House, 1886
538 Fillmore Street

GeorgeDownsHouse

The property that the house sits on was originally purchased by Hector Ann Downs, the wife of George W. Downs and when the house was built it originally had a small open porch where the stained glass window now is. This made an awkward entry because of the proximity to the staircase, so Mrs. Downs had the original porch enclosed and the present porch and entry to the side as it is now. The house is a frame structure built of native woods, has eleven foot nine inch ceilings and four fireplaces. The carved wood mantelpiece in the living room surrounds a brown ceramic tile framed fireplace. The stairway, rail and newel post, hall light fixture, and shutters are all originals

In later years another major change took place when the cupola and widow’s walk on the top of the house was removed when a leak was discovered and the roof was repaired. The solarium and carriage house were added in recent years around the 1960s and at one time the carriage house was an antique shop. It has been renovated to a private residence and will not be on the tour this year.

One of the previous owners noticed a cut in the kitchen floor boards, and on lifting out the flooring, found a combination cistern and well under the house. In the well were some 175 bottles of all kinds, some tracing back to an early-day pharmacy.

TrinityUnitedMethodist

Trinity United Methodist Church, 1871
609 Taylor Street

Although Port Townsend’s Methodists organized in 1853, their first minister was not appointed until the following year. The first building was built in 1871 at Clay & Taylor and has been identified as a “Primary” building - one with “strong architectural or historical qualities.

In the early part of 1871, the Presiding Elder of the Puget Sound District, J.F. Devore, secured a lot and the first building was erected. Three years later plans were entered upon to improve and beautify the structure. It was weather-boarded, lathed and plastered, and papered; pews were placed, and it was furnished with carpets and chandeliers.

Then in 1884-85, the building was enlarged and in 1900 it was turned on the lot and used as part of a new structure which is the present church. It was at this time; the stained glass windows were added. Since then, kitchen facilities and accommodations for serving wedding receptions, etc. have seen added in the basement. Additions have been made to provide needed Sunday school rooms including a “Crib Room” for small children, and the Sunday school building behind the church along Taylor Street was built sometime between 1928 and 1945.

CityHallMuseum

City Hall, 1891
540 Water Street

The Jefferson County Courthouse and City Hall were both conceived at the peak of Port Townsend’s prosperity and completed just before the fatal Panic of 1893. City Hall was built downtown on Water Street with Classic and Romanesque details. It was pretty much a local production although the contractors, Bamber, Grolier & Colllins were out-of-town boys. All the materials, including the sandstone, sills, lintels, bricks, and cedar that were used on the building were from local areas. The estimated cost for the building was $30,000; however, the eventual cost was $85,000.

A visit to City Hall is a must if you want to go back in time to view the chamber where councilmen “chewed the rag”; check out the police courtroom, where unfortunate vagrants, common drunks, and other petty offenders told their tales of woe before being taken away to join the chain gang and see where the faithful firemen slide down the slipping-pole when the alarm sounded at the fire house.

The original tower and third floor received a serious blow in the form of a violent southwesterly storm in 1945 and the decision was made to remove the third floor and replace it with a flat-built up roof.

Before you exit make sure you visit the museum and get lost in Port Townsend’s “picturesque” past for hours.

Jefferson County Historical Museum Building, 1892
540 Water Street

On March 1, 2007, the JCHS Museum re-opened with beautifully redesigned exhibits in the magnificently restored 1892 City Hall building. Housed in the former municipal court room, fire hall and jail spaces, the Museum’s exhibits illustrate the lively history of communities born in waterfront forests over 150 years ago.

The museum’s location in the historic City Hall is the ideal location for history to come alive. Its strong, direct connection to area history creates opportunities for moods, moments and feelings representative of a time now gone yet near.

One can go down a stairway of uncertain destination, encounter the subterranean smell of cold masonry and then stand in a murky jail cell; navigate through a work of nooks, crannies and levels bedecked with historical significance; or stand on a stair leading to the hayloft, look out across a large wooden room filled with horse-drawn conveyances and maritime artifacts and see century-old brick buildings through a window on a misty day.

SiebenbaumBuilding2

Siebenbaum Building aka Bergstrom Antique Auto Museum, 1917
815 Washington Street
Manager: Robin Bergstrom

In the late 1880’s and in the 1890’s this was the site of a house and a store, both occupied and identified as being of Chinese lineage. Both structures still stood around 1905, when the property belonged to John Siebenbaum.

John Siebenbaum owned the property and in 1917 had Harry Cotton, a local contractor build this first fireproof garage in Port Townsend. The new building was first occupied by the Peninsula Motor Company, of which Siebenbaum was a partner. He later became sole owner and hired W.J. Buhler as the manager in 1922. Mr. Buhler opened a Chevrolet-Oldsmobile dealership and this building was the service department for the dealership whose show room and office was across the street in what is now known at the Antique Mall.

Mr. Buhler purchased the company but not the building and operated it as Buhler Motor Company until 1973, when he sold it to Lee Rae and it became Lee Rae Chevrolet and Olds for the next five year. After this business closed two other auto related businesses were in the building until 1981 when Robin Bergstrom opened his Antique and Classic Autos.

chapelbay

Teahouse at Chapel Bay
(St. Paul’s Episcopal Parish Hall), c. 1860s
Jefferson Street

We welcome our Homes Tour guests to take a break and enjoy complimentary tea and homemade cookies served by volunteers in period costume at our new Teahouse venue, Chapel Bay.

This lovely building—one of Port Townsend’s oldest structures—has a history of travel. Perched on a bluff overlooking Port Townsend and the bay, it was barged from Bellingham in the 1800s to serve as St. Paul’s parish hall. When the church built its new hall in the late 1990s, it was rescued by its current owner and moved to its present location.

Sitting atop a daylight basement, the Gothic-style Chapel Bay has been refurbished with the original windows and wainscoting. In its latest role is as a Victorian wedding chapel and event center, Chapel Bay links Port Townsend’s past and present.

rothschild

Rothschild House, 1868
Taylor and Franklin Streets

Step back in time to the beginning of Port Townsend as you enter one of the city’s oldest homes and one of Washington State’s smallest state parks. Perched on a bluff overlooking the historical district, the Rothschild House was built for his family by merchant D.C.H. Rothschild, or the Baron as he became universally known. Born in Bavaria, Henry Rothschild settled in Port Townsend in 1858 after traveling extensively around the world. Ten years later, after living with his family over his downtown store, he built the home where it now stands. His widow, Dorette, lived there until her death in 1918 and allowed only minor changes, such as the instillation of a bathroom. Her daughter lived in the home for nearly 78 years until her death in 1954. The last surviving member of the family, Eugene, donated the house to the Washington State Parks Department and in 1962, it opened to the public as an historic site. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is managed for the park system by the Jefferson County Historical Society.

An excellent example of Greek Revival architecture, the home is virtually unchanged from the way it was nearly 150 years ago and is an accurate reflection of our early culture. The home embraces original furnishings and artifacts of the family down to the most common objects. The children’s room looks like the children have just stepped outside to play; the parlor waits for visiting callers; and the dining room table is set with the family’s best plates. Outside, roses from earlier generations still bloom and herbs still rise in the springtime.

grace house

James W. Stockand aka Grace House, 1887
110 F Street

This beautiful home was built in 1887 by 26 year old James W. Stockand with the help of his brother-in-law Thomas Drummond, a Port Townsend contractor. The house and its carriage house were completed in 1890 at a cost of $3,400. Restoration of this house which included a new foundation and roof was completed in 1978. Further renovations in the late 1980's were recognized by the Jefferson County Historical Society and the owners received the Mary Johnson Award of Appreciation.

Over the past several years the current owners who moved into this house in 2001, have continued the careful restoration of the interior of this home. The house has a new roof, rebuilt chimneys, new wiring and plumbing and refinished wood floors as well as historically accurate hand-screened Victorian wallpapers by Bradbury & Bradbury.

Recently completed is a new downstairs bath with its antique dresser sink and a mosaic tile floor consisting of 6 colors and 4000 separate pieces of tile requiring more than 3000 separate cuts. The upstairs bathroom which was carved out of attic space in the early 1900's is now an elegant master bath with Jacuzzi tub, propane fireplace, original claw foot tub and angel tile wall mural. This house is a fine blend of Victorian charm and modern amenities.

frank hastings house

Frank W. Hastings House aka The Old Consulate Inn, c. 1890
313 Walker Street

Senator Frank Hastings was the second son of Port Townsend founder Loren B. Hastings. Frank began building this big red mansion in 1889. His plan was to build a $10,000 mansion to impress his fiancé, but he went broke in the depression of 1891 and was forced to abandon its construction before completion. He managed to get the house weather tight - roof, walls, and windows – and to get three rooms livable with the last of his money. He lived in the unfinished house until he lost it for back taxes in 1904 to Mr. Olsen, the county tax assessor.

Mr. Olsen finished the house and rented a room to August Duddenhausen, the German Consul, from 1908 until 1911. Duddenhausen was allowed to do his official business in the parlor. The Hastings House is now a lovely Bed & Breakfast called The Old Consulate Inn. It is a fine example of Queen Anne style architecture and has commanding view of Port Townsend Bay, Mount Rainier and the Historic Court House.

orear

Newton W. 0'Rear House, 1891
1932 Washington Street
Owners: Frank & Pat Durbin

Although built during the Victorian period, the house surprises you with interior construction features of mostly Craftsman detailing. The house was built in 1891 as a carriage house with attached windmill for the F.W. Hastings (The Old Consulate Inn) home. Originally the building faced Jefferson Street at the corner of Walker. In the early 1900s, when the Hastings property was sold for back taxes, C.A. Olson purchased the buildings and six lots on the block. He kept the Hastings house but sold the carriage house and the two lots where the house now sits to Newton O’Rear, a former editor of the Port Townsend “Leader” and a Custom’s Inspector at the time of the property’s purchase.

By 1906, Mr. O’Rear had the carriage house turned 180 degrees, moved to the new location on Washington Street and placed on a half basement foundation. The tower’s Mansard roof was the original windmill’s water tower. A tank sat in the top, with the windmill mechanism going through what is now the entry hall and master bedroom. O’Rear had the structure converted into a seven-room residence with three bedrooms. The tower space, then, as now, was used as attic storage. The house originally had gas lighting, two wood stoves and no fireplaces.

The current owners have just completed an eight year restoration done in four major phases that added space but duplicate the details of the original period. Projects still remain to be done, but the interior is nearly complete and displays a forty year collection of antiques and collections.

jcsaunders

Saunders House, 1891
2365 E Sims Way

This large and impressive home has a colorful history and many unique features. It retains its Victorian charm despite having several owners over the years with differing ideas of renovation and decorating. Commanding a hillside lot overlooking the waterfront, the home has a wrap-around porch. A third story was used at various times for dancing, showing movies, and a girls' dormitory. An unusual feature of the home is the dining room fireplace, which has a window in the middle of the chimney.

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2007 Homes Tour

 

Frank A. Bartlett House, 1883
314 Polk Street

bartlett

A true Victorian architectural treasure, the Bartlett House is one of the first in Port Townsend to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places. In a prominent spot overlooking Port Townsend and the bay, its striking Mansard roof and Italianate detailing are guaranteed to lure curious tourists to the uptown historic area.

Frank A. Bartlett was the son of Port Townsend merchant Charles C. Bartlett and a descendant of Josiah Bartlett, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Frank was a wealthy young businessman when he built this home, but suffered a reversal of fortune during the depression of the early 1890s and moved to a less elegant house. The current owners have restored the home’s 14 spacious rooms, which include five bedrooms and a carriage house. They have lovingly brought back the house to its former elegance by adding wallpaper and wainscoting, refinishing the fir floors to their original beauty, remodeling the kitchen while retaining the charm of the period, and painting the exterior and interior to reflect traditional colors of the Victorian days.

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Albert Bash House, 1890
1428 Monroe Street

This impressive Queen Anne style home was completed in 1890 for Albert W. Bash and his wife, Flora. Albert Bash was appointed by President Garfield as a customs collector for the District of Puget Sound and was also a friend of Benjamin Harrison who, while a U.S. Senator, visited the Bash family in Port Townsend. During Bash’s term as an inspector, Congress appropriated funds for the erection of Port Townsend’s custom house, which serves now as the post office.

Current owners of the Bash House purchased it in 1997 and have been working in six carefully planned phases to restore it to its original elegance. They first had to overcome years of neglect by repairing leaks and reinforcing the foundation.

A second story 1930s remodel was removed and construction of a new roofline gave the home an appearance similar to the original structure. Interior walls were replastered or drywalled, then painted, stenciled and/or wallpapered to recreate the way it would have been decorated in the Aesthetic Movement style.

Boasting an unusually fine collection of stained glass windows, the home provides magnificent views of Port Townsend Bay from its hillside location.

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The Bishop Victorian Hotel, 1890
714 Washington Street

Built by William Bishop, a British sailor who jumped ship near Victoria to homestead in Port Townsend, the Bishop Block has housed many interesting businesses in its heyday, including a cigar store (the "Owl Cigars" sign remains on the side of the building), a tavern, a garage and a furniture store. In 1940, the U.S. Navy bought it and converted it into a rooming house to shelter civilian workers during WWII.

Today it is an elegant hotel, restored to reflect the Victorian period, with antique furniture and glass, paintings and flowers. Most of the period pieces gracing the guest rooms and lobby were purchased locally. Two of the hotel’s suites are on the ground level so are easily accessible. The layout of the suites and common areas of the three-story hotel is designed to encourage guests to feel at home and wander freely through the building.

The Bishop’s award-winning formal Victorian Garden has hosted many beautiful weddings and community events.

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James B. Hogg House, 1891
932 Pierce Street

James B. Hogg was born in Connelsville, Pennsylvania in 1857 and came west as an engineer on the Cascade Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad. He grew interested in Port Townsend when he was named Chief Engineer of the Port Townsend Southern Railroad and was charged with exploring, locating and overseeing construction of its line.

Hogg built a large home that remains among the city’s surviving historic structures and moved into it when he wed his first wife, Lucy McIntyre. She was 16 years old, he was 34 and the wedding brought out “the brightest and best in Port Townsend’s society,” according to the local newspaper.

Unfortunately, at the turn of the century, the marriage ended in divorce and Hogg returned to his birthplace.

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Mount Baker Block Building, 1889
Water and Tyler Streets

Completed in 1889 by Charles Eisenbeis, the four-story Mount Baker Block Building was originally intended to be a 96-room, five-story hotel with a projected cost of $100,000. However, competition with another hotel and a lack of funds forced a scale-back of the project to a four-story office building containing eight ground-level stores, 69 offices and an elevator, and costing $80,000. Another blow to Eisenbeis’ plans came just as the building was nearing completion: word that the railroad terminus would not come to Port Townsend caused the few businesses inhabiting the ground level floor to close. Construction stopped, leaving the top two floors unfinished for 110 years when, in 1999, the interiors of floors three and four were completed.

Today, the building has enjoyed a renaissance, with most of its office and retail spaces occupied with a variety of businesses.

Designed by Seattle architects Whiteway and Schroeder, the huge stone structure is the cornerstone of Port Townsend’s downtown area.

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Ann Starrett Mansion, 1889
744 Clay Street

This magnificent mansion, built by George Starrett for his wife Ann VanBokkelenn is renowned for its architecture, frescoed ceilings, and a mysterious three-tier free-floating staircase, which leads to a rare solar calendar that the sun lights up four times a year. An eight-panel fresco features four dancing nymphs painted in Ann's image depicting the four seasons and four maidens depicting virtues. The scantily clad winter nymph shivering in a blizzard caused much gossip in Victorian Port Townsend.

Ann Starrett adorned her home with frescoes and stained glass, as well as carved lions from her family crest, doves and ferns which makes it more than any other Port Townsend house not only of local, but national significance.

Fenn House, 1889
Jefferson Street

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It’s no accident that Fenn House looks so comfortable beside Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church. As the original rectory, it was designed to be architecturally compatible with the church. First occupied by Rev. Jesse Taylor, it provided housing for the rectors and vicars of Saint Paul’s until 1989. It retains much of the original wood moldings, sashes and floors as well as the lovely stained glass window in the hallway entrance. In the 1990s, the kitchen was removed and a parish hall and church office were added. Today, Fenn House is used as the rector’s office, nursery, children’s chapel and for meetings.

Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1865
Jefferson and Tyler Streets

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The oldest Episcopal Church in the State of Washington, Saint Paul’s is an example of Gothic Revival style. When built, it was situated on a bluff overlooking the harbor but in 1883 at the request of the town council, it was placed on logs and moved to its present location with horses and a windlass.

Captain James W. Seldon of the U.S. Revenue Cutter Wyanda donated a ships’ bell to the church, on condition that it ring as a signal on foggy days. The bell guided many seamen safely to port and still rings at the conclusion of all services, Sundays and weekdays.

A. Horace Tucker, the contractor who built the church, constructed many of the town’s buildings. His own home on the corner of Franklin and Quincy was built for his bride, whose wedding inspired the building of St. Pauls.

Samuel Brooks, who constructed the church’s beautiful roof trusses, was a seaman and the interior structure reflects this. The center Gothic arches combine with graceful curved side members to give the appearance of the frame of a sailing ship. Unlike popular conceptions of Victorian architecture, the church is almost completely devoid of ornament and relies on vertical proportions for its effectiveness.

rothschild

Rothschild House, 1868
Taylor and Franklin Streets

Step back in time to the beginning of Port Townsend as you enter one of the city’s oldest homes and one of Washington State’s smallest state parks. Perched on a bluff overlooking the historical district, the Rothschild House was built for his family by merchant D.C.H. Rothschild, or the Baron as he became universally known. Born in Bavaria, Henry Rothschild settled in Port Townsend in 1858 after traveling extensively around the world. Ten years later, after living with his family over his downtown store, he built the home where it now stands. His widow, Dorette, lived there until her death in 1918 and allowed only minor changes, such as the instillation of a bathroom. Her daughter lived in the home for nearly 78 years until her death in 1954. The last surviving member of the family, Eugene, donated the house to the Washington State Parks Department and in 1962, it opened to the public as an historic site. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is managed for the park system by the Jefferson County Historical Society.

An excellent example of Greek Revival architecture, the home is virtually unchanged from the way it was nearly 150 years ago and is an accurate reflection of our early culture. The home embraces original furnishings and artifacts of the family down to the most common objects. The children’s room looks like the children have just stepped outside to play; the parlor waits for visiting callers; and the dining room table is set with the family’s best plates. Outside, roses from earlier generations still bloom and herbs still rise in the springtime.

chapelbay

Teahouse at Chapel Bay
(St. Paul’s Episcopal Parish Hall), c. 1860s
Jefferson Street

We welcome our Homes Tour guests to take a break and enjoy complimentary tea and homemade cookies served by volunteers in period costume at our new Teahouse venue, Chapel Bay.

This lovely building—one of Port Townsend’s oldest structures—has a history of travel. Perched on a bluff overlooking Port Townsend and the bay, it was barged from Bellingham in the 1800s to serve as St. Paul’s parish hall. When the church built its new hall in the late 1990s, it was rescued by its current owner and moved to its present location.

Sitting atop a daylight basement, the Gothic-style Chapel Bay has been refurbished with the original windows and wainscoting. In its latest role is as a Victorian wedding chapel and event center, Chapel Bay links Port Townsend’s past and present.

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Fuge HouseName: John E. Fuge House
Year Built: c. 1879
Location: 1609 Washington St.
Area: Uptown Port Townsend

Mr. John Edgecomb Fuge built this house in 1879 as a home for his family. Mr. Fuge was a ship's carpenter originally from Plymouth, England. He, his wife Eliza and, subsequently, his descendants lived in the home until 1962. Mr. Fuge owned the block that the house is sited on, and built the three cottages immediately to the east, as well.

The house is an example of the Italianate style, distinguished by its simpler overall design, tall windows and brackets at the roofline. Originally, the house was heated with coal and had no indoor plumbing. There was a tin tub in the kitchen where hot water could be heated. The bathroom was an outdoor privy.

Mr. Fuge used his shipwright's craft to good advantage in the house. The front staircase is built with only a single nail, and after 140 years, still does not squeak.

The woodwork in the house was faux grained throughout. Local fir was painted to look like oak, mahogany and walnut on the baseboards, windows, sills, stairs and all the doors. Most of the original graining is intact. The rest has been restored by the owners so that the entire house has its original look again.

The walls of the house are plaster. Again, most of the walls were intact; but some had broken. These have been repaired using an authentic plaster recipe over lath. The windows are original, double-hung windows and still have their cast iron window weights to facilitate raising and lowering.

The house sits on a new foundation, and has a cedar shake roof.

In 2018, the Fuge Home was awarded the Jefferson County Historical Society’s Mary Johnson Award for the excellence and authenticity of its restoration.

Data modified from the National Register of Historic Places, the former Victorian Festival Heritage Home Tour, property owners and other sources. All material copyrighted by PTguide.com.

 

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